Wednesday, 28 February 2018

Our Next Walk - Saturday 10th March 2018

The Wizard at Alderley Edge

An easy walk starting from the National Trust Car Park at Alderley Edge. We shall be walking on the SW side of Macclesfield Rd through the area with industrial archaeology. A couple of stiles and prospect of mud along the route. Suitable footwear required. Lunch will be at the Wizard Pub.

Meet in St Pauls Rd at 9. 30 a.m.

The National Trust Car Park is on the B5087 at Nether Alderley. Post Code SK10 4UB

Saturday, 10 February 2018

Greenbooth and Naden Reservoirs - Saturday 10th February 2018

Due to extremely wet and cold weather conditions we had to cancel this walk. We shall probably tackle it later in the year when the weather will have improved.

Wednesday, 13 December 2017

Christmas Ramble and Lunch – Saturday 9th December 2017

At the start on a cold and frosty morning

This year our Christmas ramble started from the Greyhound Inn at Ashley in Cheshire and a party of twelve set off to explore the paths and bye ways of this pretty Cheshire village. As always, this walk is more about lunch than ramble and the short four mile walk meant we were back at the Greyhound in plenty of time to enjoy an excellent Christmas Dinner in warm, comfortable surroundings.

Off into the snow

Coffee break in the cold

Muddy path by M56 Motorway

Tripping through the mud.

Back onto the fields

Making our way to the pub!

Christmas dinner at the Greyhound

Sunday, 19 November 2017

The Saltscape Trail - Saturday 11th November 2017

A party of ten left the Lion Salt Works, Northwich on a fine November Saturday to explore the Saltscape Trail. The first part of the walk took us along the Trent & Mersey Canal for about a mile and at this point we crossed over the bridge and into Maybury Country Park. From here we followed the path along Budworth Mere to the Coffee Shop where we stopped and enjoyed a break in the warm sunshine.

At this junction the route crossed fields but with all the recent rain, which had made the paths extremely muddy, we elected to follow the road to the Anderton Lift. Only a short walk but there is a  narrow bridge without footpath and caution should be exercised if following this route. However, we were able to join the canal again very quickly which took us directly to the Lift.

Unfortunately the lift is not working at week-ends in winter and we were disappointed not to see the boats going up and down. The Visitor Centre is open but time did not permit a visit on this occasion.

It was here we joined the Saltscape Trail which followed the River Weaver before joining the paths to take us around Neumanns Flash and back to the Salt Works. Estimated distance about 5 miles.

At the end of the walk we enjoyed an excellent lunch at the newly refurbished 'Cock at Budworth'.


Lion Salt Works               Cock at Budworth

All ready to go - Salt Works Northwich

Trent Mersey Canal


Autumn colours - Beech Trees

11/11 at 11 a.m. Two minutes reflection.

Bird watching at Budworth Mere

Path through Maybury Country Park

Entrance to Anderton Lift from Trent & Mersey Canal

Marshalls Wood

Mmmm,,,Cheese cake scone at the Cock at Budworth

Monday, 11 September 2017

Dunham Massey - Saturday 9th September 2017

Our small group started our four mile walk from the National Trust car park at Dunham Massey. The first part of the walk through the village was through heavy rain but spirits were raised when we came upon the local craft brewery! Unfortunately we were unable to sample any of the prize winning beers at the time as the brewer was busy. However, more on this later.

We then walked along the canal towpath alongside the River Bollin and over an aqueduct. The weather improved significantly and we were able to have a coffee break in full sun. We were lucky enough to get very close to a heron on the path who showed us great disdain as he assumed he owned that stretch of the canal.

Coming down from the raised canal, we walked over a cobbled path into Little Bollington, over a footbridge onto a grassy path and into Dunham Park. We saw a deer and various waterfowl on our way back to the car park.

We had a very pleasant lunch at the Axe and Cleaver pub where we were able to sample the beer of the Dunham Massey Brewing Company!

Our group taking shelter from the rain outside St Marks Dunham Massey

The heron guarding his patch

The coffee break in the sunshine on the tow path

St Marks

The school house built in 1759

Obviously he can’t read!

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Hartington - Saturday 12th July 2017

Again a walk where the weather did not look at all promising but was actually sunny and pleasant. We started in the small but 'beautifully formed' village of Hartington which is tucked away about 8 miles SE of Buxton. The walk was a mainly 'easy' ramble along the river Dove and took in two other lesser known Dales namely Wolfescote Dale and Biggin Dale. The second moderate uphill stretch rewarded us with sparkling views of the Peak District. There was plenty of chatting along the way which added to the enjoyment-as did the teashop back in Hartington. Yes of course we indulged! Thanks to Janet who lead us so confidently.

Now where do we go from here?

Short uphill stretch

Across the Dove

Should you be walking here!

Tea and cake indulgence!

Monday, 10 July 2017

Monsal Dale - Saturday 8th July 2017

A small group of four made the journey to Monsal Dale, close to Bakewell, in warm and sunny weather. The walk was based on the Monsal Dale and Brushfield circuit starting from the lovely vantage point of the Monsal Head Hotel. From there you could look down into the valley some 250 feet below. The view is spectacular over the River Wye.

Our walk took us over the Headstone Viaduct and along the Monsal Trail through both the Cressbrook and Litton Tunnels, doing our best to avoid the cyclists! John Ruskin, the writer was critical of the Viaduct when it was built in 1863 as it destroyed the beauty of the Dales. However, time moves on and a preservation order was placed on it in 1970. The curved tunnels were cut through limestone and have a combined length of nearly 1,000 yards (or 914 meters in new money).

We spotted an abundance of wild flowers along the Trail; including wild orchids, harebells and Scabious Devils Bit.

We then left the Trail and headed up a long, steep incline to the High Dale. Walking through some disused mine-workings led us to the village of Brushfield and dropping down to the High Dale dry valley. We came in sight of the Hotel and had to negotiate a steep, flinty path to bring us back to the Trail and the final ascent of the 250 feet of steps back to the Hotel.

We appreciated the later than anticipated lunch and a cool drink at the Hotel, followed by an ice cream sitting on a bench overlooking the valley in glorious sunshine.

Monsal dale from Monsal Head


Cressbrook from Monsal Trail

Inside the Litton Tunnel

Litton Mill

Climbing High Dale

Through the High Dale

Sunday, 11 June 2017

Parkgate - Saturday 10th June 2017

It was pouring with rain as just four of us left St Paul's Road for the drive to Parkgate.

Parkgate is on the Wirral Peninsular in Cheshire and is a curious and quirky place. It used to be an important sea port on the River Dee in the 18th Century. Well known people such as the composer Handel sailed from here to Dublin. However the Dee estuary silted up and the sea retreated a long way out from the 'sea front' but the sea wall remains.

We walked north with the silted up reed beds on our left and the Welsh Hills rising above the distant remaining Chanel of the river Dee. We turned East for a short stretch and then South-ish, along tracks, minor roads and bits of the Wirral Way. Part of the route took us over the Neston Golf course and then along it's edge where we enjoyed stunning views of the river channel, and the estuary mouth. We worked our way round to 'The Old Port'. This has sandstone blocks from the original port and provided a good lunch stop. The final part of the walk was right on the edge of the reed beds and was rather damp and muddy underfoot.
When back in Parkgate, it was time for tea and cake!

This was a very pleasant and peaceful walk of about six miles. There were wild flowers everywhere; including roses and orchids.The reed beds are home to many birds. Binoculars would have been useful! We saw the expected gulls but also spotted herons and oyster catchers.

So, did we get wet? No, it was totally dry-if you discount a few spits and spots at our lunch spot!

Moel Famau




Sunday, 14 May 2017

Worsley - Saturday 13th May 2017

You would not normally associate Worsley, Greater Manchester with the country side  and a place for a ramble but within this suburb of Manchester lies a walk which you would only expect to find much further afield.

Starting from the car park adjacent to the motorway the route takes you along the Bridgewater Canal towards Manchester, Then at Monton Green your turn right, at the 'lighthouse' on the left, onto the Roe Green Loop Line. This line originally linked Worsley with Bolton before closure in 1969 It was reopened in 2016 as a cycling and pedestrian route and is now an attractive woodland walk teeming with wildlife.

Leaving the Loop Line at Beeson Green a short walk along the road brings you to the entrance to Worsley Woods. Another attractive woodland full of wildlife and native plants. Wood carvings of plants are to be seen along the path and if you look carefully in the locations the wild plants can be found in the undergrowth

The path eventually opens out into the Old Warke Dam where the old estate lodge, known locally as the 'Gingerbread House'  is sited. Further along is a platform extended into the dam and from here there are views of the woodlands across the water and the 'Aviary' an old hunting and fishing lodge which belonged to Lord Egerton. As expected there is plenty of water fowl to be seen in this area.

Following the route at the side of the water you come to a path on the right leading to Worsley Delph. Again this is another natural woodland area full of interest and access has been made easier by the addition of a boardwalk in the wet areas.Returning from the Delph a short walk brings you back into Worsley and on the last stretch you have the opportunity to see the part of the old industrial heritage before returning to the car park.

There are plenty of tearooms, restaurants and pubs for lunch or a snack at the end of the walk.

Coffee break Worsley Station

What time is the next train!

Roe Green Loop Line

Through the tunnel

Wood carving entrance to Worsley Woods

Worsley Woods

OLd Warke Dam

Viewing platform. Aviary Lodge in background

The Delph